Titling indigenous communities protects forests in the Peruvian Amazon

View/Open
Date
Submission date
Authors
Blackman, A.
Corral, L.
Lima, E.S.
Asner, G.P.
Type
Journal Article
Version number
Status

Developing countries are increasingly decentralizing forest gover- nance by granting indigenous groups and other local communities formal legal title to land. However, the effects of titling on forest cover are unclear. Rigorous analyses of titling campaigns are rare, and related theoretical and empirical research suggests that they could either stem or spur forest damage. We analyze such a campaign in the Peruvian Amazon, where more than 1,200 indigenous commu- nities comprising some 11 million ha have been titled since the mid- 1970s. We use community-level longitudinal data derived from high- resolution satellite images to estimate the effect of titling between 2002 and 2005 on contemporaneous forest clearing and disturbance. Our results indicate that titling reduces clearing by more than three- quarters and forest disturbance by roughly two-thirds in a 2-y window spanning the year title is awarded and the year afterward. These results suggest that awarding formal land titles to local communities can advance forest conservation.

Subject Keywords
Sponsors
Description
Identifiers
Code
Effective date
Review year
Alternative Strategy
Alternative Type
Pest Type
Alternative Trial
Coverage Country
Peru
Method
Active Ingredient
Permanent Record Identifier