Publication:
Intact Forest in Selective Logging Landscapes in the Tropics.

dc.contributor.authorPutz, Francis E.
dc.contributor.authorGriscom, B.W.
dc.contributor.authorGopalakrishna, T.
dc.contributor.authorRoopsind, A.
dc.contributor.authorUmunay, P.M.
dc.contributor.authorZalman, J.
dc.contributor.authorEllis, E.A.
dc.contributor.authorRuslandi
dc.contributor.authorEllis, P.W.
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-23T18:55:20Z
dc.date.available2022-01-23T18:55:20Z
dc.identifier.urihttps://open.fsc.org/handle/resource/556
dc.titleIntact Forest in Selective Logging Landscapes in the Tropics.en
dcterms.abstractThe selective logging that characterizes most timber extraction operations in the tropics leaves large patches of logging blocks (i. e., areas allocated for harvesting) intact, with no direct impacts of the harvest. For example, in the ?10,000 ha we sampled in 48 forest management enterprises in Africa (Gabon, Republic of Congo, and the Democratic Republic of Congo), Indonesia, Suriname, and Mexico, an average of 57% (range 22–97%) of the area in logging blocks was not directly affected by timber harvests. The proportion of intact forest within logging blocks decreased very slightly with increases in harvest intensity in the accessed portion of the logging blocks (9–86 m3 ha?1 ) but decreased strongly with harvest intensity in entire logging blocks (0.3–48.2 m3 ha?1 ). More forest was left intact in areas farther from roads, on slopes >40%, and within 25 m of perennial streams, but the effect sizes of each of these variables was small (?8%). It is less clear how much of the intact forest left after one harvest will remain intact through the next. Conservation benefits without reductions in timber yields will derive from better management planning so that sensitive and ecologically critical areas, such as steep slopes and riparian buffers, constitute permanent reserves of intact forest in selectively logged landscapes in the tropics.en
dcterms.accessRightsPublic
dcterms.accessRightsOpen access
dcterms.bibliographicCitationPutz, F.E., Baker, T., Griscom, B.W., Gopalakrishna, T., Roopsind, A., Umunay, P.M., Zalman, J., Ellis, E.A. and Ellis, P.W., 2019. Intact forest in selective logging landscapes in the tropics. Frontiers in Forests and Global Change, 2, p.30.en
dcterms.issued2019
dcterms.languageen
dcterms.licenseCC-BY-4.0en
dcterms.typeJournal Article
dspace.entity.typePublication
fsc.evidenceCategoryFSC impact-related
fsc.focus.forestZoneTropical
fsc.focus.sustainDimensionEnvironmental
fsc.focus.sustainDimensionEconomic
fsc.inTransitionno
fsc.issue.economicForest Management
fsc.issue.environmentalForest disturbance, forest deagradation
fsc.subjectForest disturbance
fsc.subjectForest degradation
fsc.topic.economicProfitability
is.availability.fullTextFull text available
is.contributor.funderTypePrivate funds (NGOs, companies, VSS self-funded etc)
is.contributor.memberForest Stewardship Council
is.coverage.countryMexico
is.coverage.countrySuriname
is.coverage.countryGabon
is.coverage.countryCongo
is.coverage.countryDemocratic Republic of the Congo
is.coverage.countryIndonesia
is.coverage.countryAlpha2MX
is.coverage.countryAlpha2SR
is.coverage.countryAlpha2GA
is.coverage.countryAlpha2CG
is.coverage.countryAlpha2ID
is.coverage.geographicLevelCountry
is.coverage.latitude23.634501
is.coverage.latitude3.919305
is.coverage.latitude-0.803689
is.coverage.latitude-0.228021
is.coverage.latitude-4.038333
is.coverage.latitude-0.789275
is.coverage.longitude-102.552784
is.coverage.longitude-56.027783
is.coverage.longitude11.609444
is.coverage.longitude15.827659
is.coverage.longitude21.758664
is.coverage.longitude113.921327
is.evaluation.collectionField measurement
is.evaluation.collectionMapping
is.evaluation.counterfactsYes
is.evaluation.dataSourceGeospatial data layers
is.evaluation.findingsThe proportions of forest left intact from logging-related activities were not different in FSC-certified and uncertified forest management entreprises.
is.evaluation.notesThe authors note that the comparison conducted is naïve since the certified and uncertified forest management enterprises were not fully comparable and/or differences in characteristics were not accounted for.
is.evaluation.outcomeyes
is.evaluation.significanceStatistically significant
is.evidenceSubTypeModeling study - patterns at a large scale using context variables
is.evidenceTypeModeling study
is.focus.productsOther forestry and logging
is.focus.sdgSDG 15 - Life on Land
is.focus.sectorsForestry
is.focus.sustainDimensionEnvironmental
is.focus.sustainDimensionEconomic
is.focus.sustainIssueForests and other ecosystems
is.focus.sustainLensLandscape approaches
is.focus.sustainOutcomeRiparian areas
is.focus.systemElementMandE outcomes and impacts
is.focus.systemElementMandE performance monitoring
is.identifier.codeImpacts
is.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3389/ffgc.2019.00030
is.identifier.fscdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.34800/fsc-international395
is.identifier.schemeNameForest Stewardship Council
is.identifier.schemeTypeVoluntary Sustainability Standards
is.item.reviewStatusPeer reviewed
is.journalNameFrontiers in Forest and Global Change
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